1] I used a minimal CentOS 6.5 64-bit installation for this blog post. I've tested this documentation on a VPS and a dedicated server.
2] Login as root in your CentOS installation.
3] "yum install gcc wget"
4] "wget http://www.malaya-digital.org/portsentry-1.2.tar.gz"
5] "tar xzf portsentry-1.2.tar.gz"
6] "cd portsentry_beta"
› Continue reading...

NOTE: All commands mentioned below are done as root.

The text below is not original. I have copied them from http://olimex.wordpress.com, and I have just modified them for installing Slackware 14.1 on the OLinuXino A10 Lime. Among the pages I've got content from are the following:

http://olimex.wordpress.com/2013/06/19/building-linux-for-a10s-from-scratch/

http://olimex.wordpress.com/2013/10/28/building-debian-sd-card-for-linux-with-kernel-3-4-from-scratch-for-a10s-olinuxino-micro/

http://olimex.wordpress.com/2014/06/23/a10-olinuxino-lime-debian-build-with-kernel-3-4-90/

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B-bAEPML8fwla21JNU12RnYxZmM/edit?usp=sharing

Setup of development environment
1] Create a VirtualBox or KVM VM for Debian "Wheezy" 7.6.0 i386. I allocated 1024MB of RAM to it. As for the virtual hard drive space, I allocated 8GB. I also recommend that you disable audio support for a VirtualBox VM.
2] Download the Net Install ISO image for Debian "Wheezy" 7.6.0 i386. Boot the mentioned ISO in the VM you've created. I used the "Install" option in the installer boot menu.
3] This set of instructions will work with everything deselected under "Software selection." You may select software to your taste during installation.
4] After the installation, the guest OS will automatically get an IP Address via DHCP.
5] As root in your guest OS:
# apt-get update
# apt-get upgrade
6] Install OpenSSH client and server software as root in your guest OS if this will make file transfers and access to your development environment convenient for you:
# apt-get install openssh-client openssh-server
› Continue reading...

NOTE: This article assumes that you have the necessary software installed in your GNU/Linux distribution.

1] Do a "su -", or do everything here as root.
2] You should have a Linux partition (hex code 83 if you use fdisk in GNU/Linux) for this purpose. Mine is /dev/sdb1
3] Do the following:

mkdir /encrypted

# Note: The following 2 commands will ask you for input.
cryptsetup -y -v luksFormat /dev/sdb1
cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/sdb1 encrypted

mkfs.ext4 /dev/mapper/encrypted
mount /dev/mapper/encrypted /encrypted

4] To unmount your encrypted filesystem:

umount /encrypted
cryptsetup luksClose encrypted

5] To remount your encrypted filesystem:

# Note: The following command will ask you for input.
cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/sdb1 encrypted

mount /dev/mapper/encrypted /encrypted

NOTE: This article assumes that you have the necessary software installed in your GNU/Linux distribution.

1] Do a "su -", or do everything here as root.
2] Create a file for the filesystem and then secure its permissions. This will create 2 GB file on the present working directory:

dd of=encrypted bs=1G count=0 seek=2 # You may substitute an absolute path for "encrypted".
chmod 600 encrypted # You may substitute an absolute path for "encrypted".

3] Do the following on the present working directory in step 2:

mkdir /encrypted
losetup /dev/loop0 encrypted # You may substitute an absolute path to the file "encrypted".

# Note: The following 2 commands will ask you for input.
cryptsetup -y luksFormat /dev/loop0 # A password for the encrypted filesystem will be asked here.
cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/loop0 encrypteddev # This will show "/dev/mapper/encrypteddev".

mkfs.ext4 /dev/mapper/encrypteddev # This will make a EXT4 filesystem on your encrypted file.
mount /dev/mapper/encrypteddev /encrypted

4] To unmount your encrypted filesystem:

umount /encrypted
cryptsetup luksClose encrypteddev # This will remove "/dev/mapper/encrypteddev".
losetup -d /dev/loop0

5] To mount your encrypted filesystem again (your present working directory should be where the "encrypted" file is located):

losetup /dev/loop0 encrypted # You may substitute an absolute path to the file "encrypted".

# Note: The following command will ask you for input.
cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/loop0 encrypteddev # This will show "/dev/mapper/encrypteddev".

mount /dev/mapper/encrypteddev /encrypted # You may substitute an absolute path to the file "encrypted"

I've just found out that the Linux 3.12 series kernel now has long term support. Because of this, I've decided to compile it for Slackware64 14.1. My hope in doing this is that I could have better performance and hardware support on my Lenovo Thinkpad E440. This blog post discusses how I compiled Linux 3.12.24. Since the Slackware team provided a sample configuration file for the mentioned Linux kernel series, the compilation process will be relatively painless.

Please note that I've disabled UEFI in the BIOS since I don't use it.

1] In my Slackware64 14.1, the only disk sets I do not install are E, F, KDEI, T, and Y.
2] Update Slackware64 14.1 first.

su - # Or login as root.
cd /etc/slackpkg
cp -p mirrors mirrors.orig
vi mirrors # Enable a mirror.
slackpkg update
slackpkg upgrade-all
shutdown -r now

3] Do the following to compile the Linux 3.12.24 kernel:

su - # Or login as root.
wget https://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/v3.x/linux-3.12.24.tar.xz
cd /boot
wget ftp://ftp.slackware.com/pub/slackware/slackware64-14.1/testing/packages/config-testing-3.12/config-huge-3.12.x64
cd /usr/src
tar xJpf ~/linux-3.12.24.tar.xz
rm linux
ln -s /usr/src/linux-3.12.24 linux
cd linux
make mrproper
cp -p /boot/config-huge-3.12.x64 .config
make oldconfig
make menuconfig # You may skip this. Do this only if you need to make configuration changes.
make bzImage
make modules
make modules_install
cp arch/x86/boot/bzImage /boot/vmlinuz-huge-3.12.24
cp System.map /boot/System.map-huge-3.12.24
cp .config /boot/config-huge-3.12.24
cd /boot
rm System.map
ln -s System.map-huge-3.12.24 System.map
rm config
ln -s config-huge-3.12.24 config
rm vmlinuz
ln -s vmlinuz-huge-3.12.24 vmlinuz
/sbin/lilo

4] Congratulations. Your Linux 3.12.24 kernel should now work after a reboot.

1] You should upgrade the cairo-1.12.14-x86_64-1_slack14.1 package to cairo-1.12.16-x86_64-1_slack14.1. The original Cairo package that shipped with Slackware64 14.1 will cause a display issue in Virt-manager. To do this:

su - # Or login as root.
slackpkg update # You should have a mirror enabled before you do this.
slackpkg upgrade-all

2] For the necessary software, you may use the binaries I compiled. If you would like to take this path, do the following immediately after step 1:

cd ~
wget http://www.malaya-digital.org/slackware64-14.1-kvm.tar.gz
mkdir kvm
cd kvm
tar xzpf ../slackware64-14.1-kvm.tar.gz
installpkg *.tgz

- OR -

If you don't want to use my binaries, you may compile (and then install immediately after compiling) the following software from slackbuilds.org in the order shown:

celt051
device-tree-compiler
libcacard
spice-protocol
pyparsing
spice
usbredir
vala
yajl
qemu
gnome-python2-gconf
gtk-vnc
ipaddr-py
libvirt
libvirt-glib
libvirt-python
pygobject3
spice-gtk
tunctl
urlgrabber
virt-manager
vte3

3] Append this in your /etc/rc.d/rc.local:

/etc/rc.d/rc.libvirt start

4] Make sure you have a /etc/rc.d/rc.local_shutdown that at least have the following:

#!/bin/bash
/etc/rc.d/rc.libvirt stop

5] Reboot Slackware.

My Thinkpad Edge E440 is one of the most basic models (20C5A012SG) without NVidia graphics(I only have the GPU on the Intel i5 4th generation processor). The WIFI interface installed on my machine is an Intel Wireless-N 7260. The following devices work from a fresh Slackware64 14.1 installation:
USB 2.0 and 3.0 ports
Touchpad
Web cam
Display in X.org
Gigabit Ethernet port

The only notable piece of hardware not working is the WIFI interface. To make it work, I compiled a more recent 3.10.28 kernel:

1] I've disabled UEFI in the BIOS. I don't use it.
2] Install Slackware64 14.1. The only disk sets I do not install are E, F, KDEI, T, and Y.
3] Update Slackware64 14.1 first. Use the Gigabit Ethernet port for internet access.
su - # Or login as root.
cd /etc/slackpkg
cp -p mirrors mirrors.orig
vi mirrors # Enable a mirror.
slackpkg update
slackpkg upgrade-all
shutdown -r now

4] Do the following to compile the Linux 3.10.28 kernel:
su - # Or login as root.
wget https://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/v3.x/linux-3.10.28.tar.xz
cd /usr/src
tar xJpf ~/linux-3.10.28.tar.xz
rm linux
ln -s /usr/src/linux-3.10.28 linux
cd linux
make mrproper
cp -p /boot/config-huge-3.10.17 .config
make oldconfig
make menuconfig # You may skip this. Do this only if you need to make configuration changes.
make bzImage
make modules
make modules_install
cp arch/x86/boot/bzImage /boot/vmlinuz-huge-3.10.28
cp System.map /boot/System.map-huge-3.10.28
cp .config /boot/config-huge-3.10.28
cd /boot
rm System.map
ln -s System.map-huge-3.10.28 System.map
rm config
ln -s config-huge-3.10.28 config
rm vmlinuz
ln -s vmlinuz-huge-3.10.28 vmlinuz
/sbin/lilo

5] By default, sound won't work correctly. To correct this, create an /etc/asound.conf with the following content:
pcm.!default {
type hw
card 1
}

ctl.!default {
type hw
card 1
}

6] Restart your computer:
shutdown -r now
7] Login as root. And then adjust your ALSA mixer settings:
alsamixer
8] Save your ALSA mixer settings:
alsactl store
9] Congratulations. Your Thinkpad Edge E440 with Slackware64 14.1 should work fine now.

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